Coscoroba Swan

Coscoroba Swan

Birds

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

COMMON NAME: Coscoroba swan
KINGDOM: Animalia
PHYLUM: Chordata
CLASS: Aves
ORDER: Anseriformes
FAMILY: Anatidae
GENUS SPECIES: Coscoroba coscoroba (a swanlike diving bird)

FAST FACTS

DESCRIPTION: This is a large white bird with bright pink duck-shaped bill and feet.
SIZE: 87.5-112.5 cm (35-45 in.)
WEIGHT: 87.5-112.5 cm (35-45 in.)
DIET: 87.5-112.5 cm (35-45 in.)
INCUBATION: 36 days
CLUTCH SIZE 4-7 eggs
SEXUAL MATURITY: Approximately 3 years
LIFE SPAN: Approximately 36 years
RANGE: South America; winter as far south as central Chile and northern Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay
HABITAT: South America; winter as far south as central Chile and northern Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay
POPULATION: GLOBAL Unknown
STATUS: IUCN Not listed
CITES Appendix II
USFWS Not listed

FUN FACTS

1. These swans get their name because of their loud, ringing 'cos-cor-ooo' when vocalizing.
2. The Coscoroba swan is a taxonomic conundrum. It is swanlike overall, but its honking voice and gooselike head make it somewhat indistinguishable. Its bill looks like a duck and it is the only swan with offspring that look like tree ducks. Some scientists, who believe it to be a member of the swans, think there is a link either between swans and true geese, or between swans and whistling ducks.
3. Coscorobas display typical swanlike threats that involve lifting their folded wings to make them appear larger. Aggressive wing flapping is also a typical threat.
4. Unlike typical swans, Coscorobas are not known to have a triumph ceremony. Such ceremonies are when a male attacks a rival suitor, then returns to his potential mate to perform an elaborate ceremony while posturing and calling.
5. Unlike typical swans, Coscorobas are not known to have a triumph ceremony. Such ceremonies are when a male attacks a rival suitor, then returns to his potential mate to perform an elaborate ceremony while posturing and calling.

ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION

Although its population is not abundant, the Coscoroba swan is not in a state of drastic decline. The most serious threat to its continued survival is loss of habitat.

Although its population is not abundant, the Coscoroba swan is not in a state of drastic decline. The most serious threat to its continued survival is loss of habitat.

The flightless young are also a source of food for small predators.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Austin, G. Birds of the World. New York. Golden Press, Inc., 1961.

Gotch, A.F. Birds - Their Latin Names Explained. UK. Blandford Books Ltd., 1981.

Gotch, A.F. Birds - Their Latin Names Explained. UK. Blandford Books Ltd., 1981.

Gotch, A.F. Birds - Their Latin Names Explained. UK. Blandford Books Ltd., 1981.

Gotch, A.F. Birds - Their Latin Names Explained. UK. Blandford Books Ltd., 1981.