Wattled Curassow

Wattled Curassow

Birds

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

COMMON NAME: wattled curassow, red-wattled curassow
KINGDOM: Animalia
PHYLUM: Chordata
CLASS: Aves
ORDER: Galliformes
FAMILY: Cracidae
GENUS SPECIES: Crax (screamer) globulosa (ball or globe)

FAST FACTS

DESCRIPTION: Large, terrestrial bird; males have bulbous red-orange knob and wattle on bill
SIZE: No data
WEIGHT: No data
DIET: Small fish, insects, aquatic crustaceans and other small animals
INCUBATION: No data
CLUTCH SIZE 2-6 eggs
SEXUAL MATURITY: No data
LIFE SPAN: 20-25 years
RANGE: Central South America in the Amazon Basin
HABITAT: Tropical forest and tropical lowlands
POPULATION: GLOBAL No data
STATUS: IUCN No data
CITES Appendix III
USFWS No data

FUN FACTS

1. They sleep high in the forest canopy at night.
2. The male curassows' brilliantly colored knobs and wattles are used in sexual displays and pair bonding.
3. The males make a low-pitched booming sound and emit a long whistle that sounds like a firecracker.

ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION

The birds of the Cracid family are one of the most threatened birds in South America. They are highly susceptible to overhunting and little is known of their natural history. Scientists agree that natural predators are not a significant source of population decline for this species, rather human interference. Until about 1950 the native people harvested the curassow for their meat and for the white vent feathers of the males.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Hilty, S. and W. Brown. A Guide to the Birds of Colombia. Princeton Univ. Press, NJ, 1986.

Perrins, C.M. and Alex Middleton. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Birds. New York: Prentice Hall Press, 1990.

angelfire.com/ca6/cracid/cracids/crax_globulosa.html