Dorcas Gazelle

Dorcas Gazelle

Mammalia

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

COMMON NAME: dorcas gazelle
KINGDOM: Animalia
PHYLUM: Chordata
CLASS: Mammalia
ORDER: Artiodactyla
FAMILY: Bovidae
GENUS SPECIES: Gazella dorcas

FAST FACTS

DESCRIPTION: Smallest gazelle, long ears, light fawn with poorly-differentiated flank stripes
SIZE: Shoulder height 55-65 cm (21.65-25.5 in.), body length 90-110 cm (35.5-47.6 in.)
WEIGHT: 15-20 kg (33-44lb.)
DIET: Browser, especially Acacia leaves, occasionally invertebrates
GESTATION: 6 months
SEXUAL MATURITY: No data
LIFE SPAN: Up to 17 years observed in zoos; wild life span unknown
RANGE: Desert and sub-desert zones
HABITAT: No data
POPULATION: GLOBAL No data
STATUS: IUCN Vulnerable
CITES Not listed; cites IUCN Vulnerable status
USFWS G. d. pelzelni listed as Endangered

FUN FACTS

1. Horns are present on both sexes. The horns may have up to 25 annular rings and are lyre-shaped (point outward then come in at the tips).
2. Though dorcas' are the smallest gazelle they are proportionately the longest limbed.
3. Dorcas' tend to separate into small groups but will congregate in large herds on localized resources. These herds may reach up to 100 individuals.
4. Dorcas' tend to separate into small groups but will congregate in large herds on localized resources. These herds may reach up to 100 individuals.

ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION

While information on dorcas gazelles is limited, they are important to the habitats where they live. As browsers these gazelles help keep vegetation from becoming overgrown. They also serve as a food source for carnivores.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Estes, Richard D. The Behavior Guide to African Mammals Including Hoofed Mammals, Carnivores, Primates. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. 1991.

Estes, Richard D. The Safari Companion. Post Mills: Chelsea Green Publishing Co. 1993.

Parker, Sybil P. ed. Grimek's Encyclopedia: Mammals Vol. 5. New York: McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. 1990.

Nowak, Ronald M. Walker's Mammals of the World Fifth Edition Vol. II. Baltimore: The John University Press. 1991.