Grant's Gazelle

Grant's Gazelle

Mammalia

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

COMMON NAME: Grant's gazelle
KINGDOM: Animalia
PHYLUM: Chordata
CLASS: Mammalia
ORDER: Artiodactyla
FAMILY: Bovidae
GENUS SPECIES: Gazella (wild goat) granti (scientific explorer)

FAST FACTS

DESCRIPTION: ASDF
SIZE: Approximately 0.6-0.9 m (2-3 ft.) at the shoulder
WEIGHT:
MALE 55-80 kg (121-176 lb.)
FEMALE 35-45 kg (77-99 lb.)
DIET: Includes leaves, grasses, herbs
GESTATION: Gestation lasts approximately 6 months; one offspring
SEXUAL MATURITY:
MALE 18-24 months
FEMALE 9-12 months
LIFE SPAN: 12 years (average)
RANGE: East Africa
HABITAT: Inhabits open steppes with brush and acacia; steppes with dense forests in flat, hilly country.
POPULATION: GLOBAL Unknown
STATUS: IUCN Lower Risk/Conservation Dependent
CITES Not listed
USFWS Not listed

FUN FACTS

1. Grant's live in herds of 10-200 individuals depending upon food availability.
2. Adult males are seen as the largest gazelle concerning body weight.
3. Grant's have the ability to vary their body temperature in order to conserve water. Raising the body temperature during the day when it's the hottest causes the animal to sweat less, thus losing less precious water.
4. Bucks maintain territories of about 500-2000 meters in diameter. They are territorial, marking their space with urine and feces. The highest-ranking males will maintain the most "attractive" territories (those with the most vegetation or areas nearest the main water sources, etc.).
5. Taking advantage of its ability to go long periods without water, Grant's often extend their range into regions where they don't have to compete with herbivores that have to eat regularly.
6. Some herds are known to migrate in the opposite direction of the main migration since it is not necessary for them to follow the rains.

ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION

Grant's gazelles are an important food source for many predators such as lions and hyenas.

They are hunted for food and trophy, but they are not in danger of extinction.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Estes, R.D. The Safari Companion: A Guide to Watching African Mammals. Vermont: Chelsea Green Publishing Co. 1993.

Gotch, A.F. Mammals-Their Latin Names Explained. Poole, U.K.: Blandford Press Btd. 1979.

Nowak, R. (ed.). Walkers Mammals of the World. Vol. II, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. 1991.

Parker, S.P. (ed.). Grizmek's Encyclopedia of Mammals. Vol 5. New York: McGraw Hill Pub. Co. 1990.