Peccaries

Peccaries

Mammalia

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

COMMON NAME: peccaries (plural), peccary (singular)
KINGDOM: Animalia
PHYLUM: Chordata
CLASS: Mammalia
ORDER: Artiodactyla
FAMILY: Tayassuidae
GENUS SPECIES: Three Genera (CatagonusPecari, and Tayassu) encompassing three species

FAST FACTS

DESCRIPTION: Coat is coarse and bristled, with a pronounced mane of longer hairs running along the middorsal region from crown to hindquarters. Body form is quite pig-like with longer, slimmer legs. Additionally, the snout is more elongate than that of a domestic pig.
SIZE: Head and body length = 750-1,112 mm (2.5-3.6 ft)
Tail length = 15-102 mm (0.6-4.0 in)
Shoulder height = 440-690 mm (17.3-27.2 in)
WEIGHT: 14-50 kg (30.9-110.2 lb); depending on species
MALE ASDF
FEMALE ASDF
DIET: Seeds, roots, cacti, carrion, invertebrates, small vertebrates, berries, and fruits - depending on species
GESTATION: 145-162 days, depending on species
SEXUAL MATURITY: 1-2 years
LIFE SPAN: 20-25 years
RANGE: Southwestern United States to central Argentina
HABITAT: Semi-arid thorn forest, steppe, desert scrub, arid woodland, rainforest, savannah, and chaco - depending on species
POPULATION: GLOBAL No data
STATUS: IUCN Catagonus is classified as Endangered
CITES Appendix I; Pecari and Tayassu are listed on Appendix II
USFWS Not listed

FUN FACTS

1. Peccaries are highly social animals - often scent-marking one another as well as physical territory.
2. When feeling threatened, Pecari will clash its canine teeth together as a warning.
3. Pecari has been recorded sprinting up to 35 km/hr.
4. Pecari's sense of smell is so good that it is capable of detecting bulbs 5-8 cm below the soil's surface.
5. Pecari, if wounded or threatened, may attack as entire herd. The herd can consist of up to 50 members.
6. Tayassu may form herds of several hundred individuals.

ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION

All species are hunted for subsistence, commecial, and/or sport purposes. Two species are additionally targeted for the commercial value of their hide. Perhaps the greatest threat to peccaries, however, is the clearing and fragmentation of the habitats in which they reside.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Nowak, Ronald M. Walker's Mammals of the World - Volume I (Sixth Edition)