Leopard Gecko

Leopard Gecko

Reptiles

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

COMMON NAME: leopard gecko, panther gecko
KINGDOM: Animalia
PHYLUM: Chordata
CLASS: Reptilia
ORDER: Squamata
FAMILY: Gekkonidae
GENUS SPECIES: Eublepharis (well-made eyelid) macularius (spotted)

FAST FACTS

DESCRIPTION: Light lavender lizard with dark purple spots; eyes are prominent in all species; toe pads are not sticky, instead they have claws
SIZE: 17.5-25 cm (7-10 in.) in total body length
WEIGHT: No data
DIET: Insects, including scorpions, but will also eat other lizards
INCUBATION: 52 days
CLUTCH SIZE 2 eggs
SEXUAL MATURITY: 18 months
LIFE SPAN: Up to 20 years
RANGE: Southern Asia, in India, Pakistan, southeast Afghanistan, Iran, and Iraq
HABITAT: Rocky deserts and sparse grasslands; mountains up to altitudes of 2,100 m above sea level
POPULATION: GLOBAL No data
STATUS: IUCN No data
CITES Not listed
USFWS Not listed

FUN FACTS

1. Nearly all geckos have a voice, ranging from a small squeak to the deafening whistles of the African whistling gecko.
2. Many geckos lack eyelids, but the leopard gecko's are not only has translucent, but they are movable, which allows them to blink and close their eyes while sleeping.
3. Like many lizards, the leopard gecko has a tail, which breaks off readily when grabbed by a predator. This permits the gecko to get away if attacked. Unfortunately, it leaves a valuable food resource behind; the tail is used as a fat storage for lean periods.
4. They are strictly nocturnal, keeping out of the heat of the day, emerging at night from holes and crevices to hunt for food.
5. They are strictly nocturnal, keeping out of the heat of the day, emerging at night from holes and crevices to hunt for food.

ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION

Leopard geckos are very popular in the pet trade and sometimes are unfortunately released to the wild in non-indigenous areas. The geckos are very effective in maintaining insect populations and are prey for other species.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Barlett, R.D. and Patricial P. Bartlett. Iguanas. Barron's, New York. 1995.

Flank, Lenny Jr. Herp Help. New York: Howell Book House, 1998.

Halliday, Tim R., and Adler, Kraig. The Encyclopedia of Reptiles and Amphibians. New York: Equinox Books, 1986.

whozoo.org/students/marmar/leopgeck.htm